New Touchless PPGI System For Monitoring Blood Flow

Blood Flow Monitoring pic

Blood Flow Monitoring
Image: upi.com

Based in the Boston area, Terry McEnany, MD, completed advanced training at Massachusetts General Hospital. Terry McEnany, MD, is experienced in diverse aspects of cardiovascular and thoracic surgery, and stays informed of latest developments in his field.

In early 2016, University of Waterloo, Canada researchers announced the creation of a portable, noninvasive device designed to provide real-time monitoring of blood flow throughout the entire body. The touchless device employs a coded hemodynamic imaging approach to measuring blood flow at several arterial points.

Traditional blood-flow measurement approaches rely on blood-pulse readings at single points in the body. Whole-body imaging, coupled with continuous data collection, offers a much better picture of what is occurring throughout the body. The new photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) approach does not involve skin contact, as sensors use ambient and active light fluctuations as a way of measuring changes in local blood volume. The PPGI system has several potential uses, and may be particularly suited to monitoring neonatal intensive care infants and patients with severe burns and extremely contagious diseases.

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Disabled Sports USA Hosts Annual Hartford Ski Spectacular

Hartford Ski Spectacular pic

Hartford Ski Spectacular
Image: skispec.org

An instructor at Aspen Skiing Company, Terry McEnany, MD, helps skiers learn to navigate the slopes. As a member of the Professional Ski Instructors of America-American Association of Snowboard Instructors (PSIA-AASI), Dr. Terry McEnany is recognized as an expert in skiing.

PSIA-AASI, a nonprofit association dedicated to the education and oversight of reputable skiing and snowboarding instructors, develops certification standards as well as complementary educational materials for the benefit of its members. Additionally, the PSIA-AASI hosts the National Adaptive Academy, which enables instructors to earn continuing education credits while taking part in an educational event.

One such event, the Hartford Ski Spectacular, focuses on helping people with disabilities return to skiing while allowing instructors to learn methods for teaching them. Hosted by Disabled Sports USA, the annual event is held in conjunction with the PSIA-AASI National Adaptive Academy and offers clinics in adaptive teaching methods. This year it will run from November 30 to December 6 in Breckenridge, Colorado.

Tips for Skiing in Powder

Holding an MD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Dr. Terry McEnany dedicated more than three decades to cardiovascular medicine and surgery. Now retired, Dr. Terry McEnany is enjoying a second career as a ski instructor in Aspen, Colorado.

In powder snow, the following tips can make skiing easier.

1. Use the legs and feet for turns. Powder creates more resistance, and therefore, skiers find it more difficult to complete turns. While the initial reaction is to turn the upper body first, you must avoid this and, instead, lead with the legs and feet. This keeps your body and movement steady.

2. Ski as close to the fall line as possible/comfortable. More air in the snow means it takes more time for surfaces to get compacted. Until snow is compacted enough to glide across, you should not make large turns.

3. Try skiing to a rhythm. Skiing to a song helps you plan out the timing of turns. You should find a musical track that not only relaxes you but has a beat that encourages you to make symmetrical turns and turn shapes.