Skiing Code of Conduct

Skiing Code of Conduct pic

Code of Conduct Skiing pic

Code of Conduct Skiing
Image: yourskicoach.com

An alumnus of Johns Hopkins University, Terry McEnany, MD, dedicated 25 years to medicine, during which time he specialized in cardiovascular diseases and thoracic surgery. Terry McEnany, MD, now spend his time on his second profession as a ski instructor in Aspen, Colorado.

No matter the level of experience, all skiers must follow the code of conduct to maintain personal safety and the well-being of others. The code outlines proper practices when using the mountain. Accessible around all ski resorts, the rules also often are printed on the back of lift tickets, depending on the venue.

Rules cover ski control, merging, and right of way. For example, a skier always gives a person downhill the right of way. He or she should yield to the downhill skier and make every effort to veer off to a pathway that will ensure the other person’s safety. Additionally, they must stop in locations that are visible and not obstructive to a trail.

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Ski Tips that Keep Beginners Safe

Establishing a successful career as a surgeon, Terry McEnany, MD, dedicated 25 years to the field of medicine. In 1998, following tenure with Mayo Clinic Health Services, Dr. Terry McEnany began his second career as a ski instructor in Aspen, Colorado.

Before hitting the slopes, beginner skiers should consider the following to ensure safety and fun.

1. Powder snow is ideal skiing terrain for experienced skiers. However, individuals new to the sport should stay away because the surfaces are uneven and heavy, causing most beginners to get stuck. Inexperienced skiers should practice and perfect ski techniques on groomed trails.

2. For better balance, skiers should keep knees bent. This encourages the body to naturally lean forward over the boots and results in better control. Additionally, a skier will find bent knees aid in navigating through uneven terrain.

3. Ski lifts come in different forms and offer varying levels of leniency when boarding. A beginner should locate a fixed lift on a trail map to try first. A fixed lift alternates chairs between fast and slow belts, allowing more time for new skiers to situate themselves safely before traveling up a hill.