Tips for Skiing in Powder

Holding an MD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Dr. Terry McEnany dedicated more than three decades to cardiovascular medicine and surgery. Now retired, Dr. Terry McEnany is enjoying a second career as a ski instructor in Aspen, Colorado.

In powder snow, the following tips can make skiing easier.

1. Use the legs and feet for turns. Powder creates more resistance, and therefore, skiers find it more difficult to complete turns. While the initial reaction is to turn the upper body first, you must avoid this and, instead, lead with the legs and feet. This keeps your body and movement steady.

2. Ski as close to the fall line as possible/comfortable. More air in the snow means it takes more time for surfaces to get compacted. Until snow is compacted enough to glide across, you should not make large turns.

3. Try skiing to a rhythm. Skiing to a song helps you plan out the timing of turns. You should find a musical track that not only relaxes you but has a beat that encourages you to make symmetrical turns and turn shapes.

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Ski Tips that Keep Beginners Safe

Establishing a successful career as a surgeon, Terry McEnany, MD, dedicated 25 years to the field of medicine. In 1998, following tenure with Mayo Clinic Health Services, Dr. Terry McEnany began his second career as a ski instructor in Aspen, Colorado.

Before hitting the slopes, beginner skiers should consider the following to ensure safety and fun.

1. Powder snow is ideal skiing terrain for experienced skiers. However, individuals new to the sport should stay away because the surfaces are uneven and heavy, causing most beginners to get stuck. Inexperienced skiers should practice and perfect ski techniques on groomed trails.

2. For better balance, skiers should keep knees bent. This encourages the body to naturally lean forward over the boots and results in better control. Additionally, a skier will find bent knees aid in navigating through uneven terrain.

3. Ski lifts come in different forms and offer varying levels of leniency when boarding. A beginner should locate a fixed lift on a trail map to try first. A fixed lift alternates chairs between fast and slow belts, allowing more time for new skiers to situate themselves safely before traveling up a hill.